Mosier Twin Tunnels Trail
Monday, October 27, 2008

It's days like today that I'm so thankful to have a husband who suggests, and gets excited about driving 60 miles to go on a family bike ride. Yeah, he's pretty much a lunatic. And while ideas like this (they're pretty darn frequent) are usually met with a sigh, a roll of the eye, and followed by a lecture about how I hate interfering with the nap schedule, I always seem to find myself in the passenger seat headed to our next grand adventure. But by the end of the day, I'm almost always glad I agreed to come along. Eric knows this about me, which is why he pushes me so much. Today was no exception. He said he was going to take Wyatt and asked if Avery and I wanted to come along.

Nope. Too much stuff to do. And besides, I'm interested in having a little mommy/daughter time.

Of course, my answer was not the right one, and did not suffice. Needless to say, there I was--again--in the passenger seat wondering where on earth he was taking me.

Everyone knows how much I love the Columbia River Gorge, but have I mentioned how breathtaking it is in the fall? Driving the Historic Columbia River Highway (built in early 1900's) is always one of my favorite activities. Before I ever lived in the Pacific Northwest, I was enamored with its beauty. I'd see pictures in calendars of old, narrow highways that curved along steep cliffs, guarded only by a delicate, white picket fence--the roadway enveloped in mossy trees that dropped the largest, most colorful leaves in the fall. Every time I drive the historic highway, I think back to all of those pictures I saw as a child and realize that those places really do exist, and that I have the grandest fortune to relish in their greatness any time I choose!


Unbeknownst to me (at least before today), there is a 4-mile section of the Old Historic Highway that was abandoned in the 1960's (when newer, faster interstates were being built) and re-opened in the 80's to only hikers, bikers, and jogger moms like me! So, that's where we ended up today. Eric and Wyatt biked it about 4 times while I jogged (only once!) out and back with Avery in the stroller. For as many years as I've been running, I have never run on a more beautiful, scenic, spacious, well-paved trail IN MY LIFE! And the autumn colors (not to mention the views of the gorge) were absolutely amazing. The only downfall...it's 60 miles away!! It has been a very long time since I've run between 7-8 miles, but with such a beautiful landscape to keep me preoccupied, there was not a single moment in which I felt bored or out of breath. We did take a little break midway through so we could snap a few pictures and take in some of the views.


I'm so glad my husband can be such a nag sometimes. Today was truly a gift.



Wine Selection:
Big Ass Zin
Personal Rating: **Fair**
Comments: I actually thought this was a decent wine right after I uncorked the bottle, but geez, it has almost been impossible to finish off the bottle. I think I'm going to try the Big Ass Cab, but I'm afraid this is the last time I drink the zinfandel. Gosh, and the label is so stinkin' cool too.

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1 Comments:
Anonymous Ashley had this to say:

Yesterday was so beautiful, it sounds like you had a great day! I love reading about your adventures!

October 27, 2008 at 10:44 AM 


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My Wine Personality:
For the most part I’m a chardonnay, as I consider myself to exhibit a somewhat sunny and mellow disposition (most of the time), but because I find a tremendous amount of joy out of showering my two kids with hugs and kisses, I also possess the subtle sweetness often found in a riesling. But don’t be fooled. I love a great outdoor adventure and am willing to try anything once. This occasional display of boldness is thought to match that of a cabernet, whereas my appreciation for nature suggests that I have an earthy component to my personality—very characteristic of a merlot. (more)

 



“Wine rejoices the heart of man and joy is the mother of all virtues.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1771