Pumpkin Carving: Round 2
Friday, October 31, 2008

Yea!! We actually got around to carving our second pumpkin last night. On our recent trip to the pumpkin patch, we searched for a perfectly round pumpkin--ideal for carving the traditional jack-o-lantern, which you saw in a previous post. But we also searched long and hard for a perfectly defective pumpkin that we felt no one else would want (that's kind of how I am...I feel a little sorry for the "unchosen"). The design for this pumpkin was a little tricky due to the its unique, but very special, shape. I finally came up with an idea that was inspired by a book I recently read titled, The Bitch In the House.



So, off on a little tangent I go.

The Bitch In the House is a book comprised of essays from women who candidly discuss their experiences as wife, mother, and corporate executive, and just how complicated it can be to balance the various roles--often awarding them the title of "Supreme Bitch" of their own house. Some of the essays are incredibly hilarious, including one that I found myself relating to beyond belief and laughing hysterically out loud as I read it, alone, in a local coffee shop. Yeah, I'm a nerd.

At any rate, this woman goes on to describe a time in which she's trying unsuccessfully after a long, exhausting day, to get her kids to stop clowning around and go to sleep so she can sit down with a book and a glass of wine (oh, how I can relate) and call it a night. But her kids, like most, have other plans--plans that include bringing their mother to the brink of a near, mental breakdown (oh, how I can relate). After numerous attempts, threats, and counting to ten behind the closed bedroom door, the mother tries one final time to get the kids to do as she asks. As she calmly walks through the door one final time, she's met with a flying object thrown by her son, that hits her directly in the eye. She falls to the floor, covers her eye, and then writes, "brought to my knees, I scream like the freaking cyclops."

I don't know why, but I just really appreciate this kind of honesty. Don't we all feel like there are times in which the monster inside us is unleashed, perhaps inappropriately, in front of our children? Although, probably not my proudest moments, it does happen occasionally and I find comfort and an insane amount of humor knowing that it happens to the best of us. So, to all of my fellow monster mommies out there, I present the cyclops pumpkin.


HAPPY HALLOWEEN!!!!!!!!



Wine Selection: Liberty School Chardonnay
Personal Rating: ****Excellent****
Comments: Nothing has changed. This is still the best chardonnay I think I've ever had.

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4 Comments:
Blogger Shelley had this to say:

Oh my gosh...that is the best pumpkin EVER! Love it!!!

November 1, 2008 at 10:58 AM 


Blogger Laura had this to say:

Awesome pumpkin! I have never seen anything like that!

November 1, 2008 at 12:42 PM 


Blogger Carmen had this to say:

lol!!! I have had many of these moments!! Great job on the pumpkin!

November 3, 2008 at 4:23 PM 


Anonymous Anonymous had this to say:

You've seriously made me die laughing at my desk with this story of the one-eyed pumpkin!!!! You are truly amazing at writing, my journalism bud. Thank you for the entertainment this dreary Thursday in Denver...

November 13, 2008 at 4:09 PM 


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My Wine Personality:
For the most part I’m a chardonnay, as I consider myself to exhibit a somewhat sunny and mellow disposition (most of the time), but because I find a tremendous amount of joy out of showering my two kids with hugs and kisses, I also possess the subtle sweetness often found in a riesling. But don’t be fooled. I love a great outdoor adventure and am willing to try anything once. This occasional display of boldness is thought to match that of a cabernet, whereas my appreciation for nature suggests that I have an earthy component to my personality—very characteristic of a merlot. (more)

 



“Wine rejoices the heart of man and joy is the mother of all virtues.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1771