Getting It Right. Sometimes.
Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Before I became a parent, I had the whole parenting thing figured out.

(Don't we all.)

My kids weren't going to live on chicken nuggets and apple juice. FAIL.

My kids would know better than to throw tantrums in the middle of the grocery store...or on an airplane. FAIL.

There would be no bargaining. My kids would know who's boss and never question my authority. FAIL.

Needless to say, my book on parental expectations has had to be rewritten a few different occasions over the past 4 1/2 years. It's such a humbling experience at times, this whole parenting thing. And a great reminder that we, as humans, are imperfect beings. We can't get it right all of the time, and frankly, there are some things which are simply out of our control. And it's okay. All we can do is pick up and move on with a plan for how to do it differently the next time.

But there are times--yes, they do exist--when the seeds we plant in our children start to bear some of the sweetest, most satisfying fruit ever to have been cultivated. And it's during these moments when we receive confirmation that, shockingly, our kids really are listening to our words and observing our actions.

Just last week, I overheard Avery playing House with her baby doll. She slipped on her high-heeled dress up shoes, threw her purse over her shoulder and told her baby that she'd be back soon. She had to go exercise so she could be healthy.

My heart just melted.

It's no secret how much we value health and fitness in our family. We try to impress upon our kids through our own actions just how important it is to live a healthy lifestyle. To know that our two-year-old "gets it" makes me feel as though we're doing at least one thing right!

Then, a couple of days following that particular incident, Wyatt shocked us when he climbed a very strenuous 1,600 feet to the summit of Saddle Mountain....

(photo courtesy of The Oregonian)

...and then back down again.

ALL. BY. HIMSELF!

Along the trail, we kept introducing him to other hikers as our 4-year-old Master Hiker, to which he would get embarrassed and scoff, "Ugh! Four-year-olds are NOT Master Hikers!" Oh, but this one is.



We showed that mountain who was boss...Venom style.



Avery, on the other hand, apparently talks the talk but doesn't necessarily walk the walk. She preferred riding piggy-back the entire way while reciting Dora the Explorer.

Vamanos, Amigo! Rapido! Rapido!
(click to enlarge)

Wyatt had no comprehension whatsoever the magnitude of what he had accomplished that day. But we did. As a reward for conquering a feat eluding even some the most well-intentioned grown-ups, we told Wyatt he earned himself whatever treat his little heart desired. We expected him to request a big scoop of chocolate ice cream because, well, that's his favorite. Instead, he insisted that his reward be nothing less than one single ginormous gummy bear.

Doh!

I suppose we should have prefaced the deal by saying it had to be something that actually existed.

FAIL.






3 Comments:
Blogger Shelley had this to say:

Awesome!!! Beautiful pics, too!

June 16, 2010 at 8:59 AM 


Anonymous Mina had this to say:

Beautiful pics and story, Cat!
Mina

June 16, 2010 at 12:09 PM 


Blogger Courtney had this to say:

Beautiful pictures!

June 18, 2010 at 11:22 AM 


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My Wine Personality:
For the most part I’m a chardonnay, as I consider myself to exhibit a somewhat sunny and mellow disposition (most of the time), but because I find a tremendous amount of joy out of showering my two kids with hugs and kisses, I also possess the subtle sweetness often found in a riesling. But don’t be fooled. I love a great outdoor adventure and am willing to try anything once. This occasional display of boldness is thought to match that of a cabernet, whereas my appreciation for nature suggests that I have an earthy component to my personality—very characteristic of a merlot. (more)

 



“Wine rejoices the heart of man and joy is the mother of all virtues.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1771